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Dr. Jenna Rooks prepares to administer the canine flu vaccine to a dog belonging to a UF veterinary medical student during a clinic held on June 22 at the UF Small Animal Hospital.

UF plays key role in managing new dog flu emergence

Published: Jul 13th, 2017

UF has played a major role in managing the emergence of a highly contagious strain of dog flu.

UF veterinary college faculty member honored by national shelter group

UF veterinary college faculty member honored by national shelter group

Published: Dec 1st, 2016

Dr. Julie Levy recently received an award from a national shelter group.

College faculty member receives national 2016 Hero Veterinarian Award

Published: Sep 14th, 2016

The American Humane Association has named a UF college faculty member its 2016 Hero Veterinarian.

Florida Veterinarian Magazine, Spring 2016

Published: Apr 21st, 2016

Read the special 40th Anniversary issue of Florida Veterinarian magazine here.

Dr. Julie Levy

DNA studies reveal that shelter workers often mislabel dogs as ‘pit bulls’

Published: Feb 17th, 2016

DNA studies reveal that shelter workers often mislabel dogs as ‘pit bulls’, UF researchers report.

Florida Veterinarian magazine: Fall 2015 issue

Published: Oct 5th, 2015

The Fall 2015 issue of Florida Veterinarian magazine is now online.

Isaza named Grevior Shelter Medicine Community Outreach Professor

Published: Jan 27th, 2015

Dr. Natalie Isaza has been named the Grevior Shelter Medicine Community Outreach Professor.

Veterinarian, dentist collaborate to help cat through unique dental procedure

Published: Nov 12th, 2014

UF veterinarian, dentist collaborate to help cat through unique dental procedure.

Operation Catnip

Targeted feral cat sterilization program yields multiple benefits

Published: Aug 20th, 2014

A recent UF study shows that a targeted feral cat sterilization program yields multiple benefits.

UF researchers: Tail vaccinations in cats could save lives

Published: Oct 31st, 2013

An alternative to a widely accepted vaccination protocol in cats could literally move the needle in terms of feline cancer treatment, UF researchers say.