Menu UF Health Home Menu
 

VETS Team Structure

UF CVM VETS team prepares rescued bear and her cub for release back into the Osceola National Forest after being treated for burns received during the 2007 Bugaboo fires in North Florida

UF CVM VETS team prepares rescued bear and her cub for release back into the Osceola National Forest after being treated for burns received during the 2007 Bugaboo fires in North Florida

The VETS team can provide assistance within the state and out of state in three different capacities. Each configuration differs in size and in cost of deployment. The team can also be EMAC’ed to another state druing a major disaster.

Core Configuration: VETS can deploy a rapid response assessment team consisting of up to six team members, a team leader, three trucks, and a base camp trailer, (which will support the team with food, shelter and power.) The team will also be able to carry significant quantities of fuel and water to be self-contained.

Animal  Technical Rescue Team: In this capacity, VETS would deploy a team of six team members, including a veterinarian, a team leader, three trucks, a base camp trailer, (which will support the team with food, shelter and power), and the technical rescue equipment and transport trailer. The team will also be able to carry significant quantities of fuel and water to be self-contained. If the requesting state is able to provide a veterinarian, the team may not need to provide one.

Deployable Field Hospital: At its largest possible configuration, VETS would deploy a team of 17 members (including large and small animal patient care teams, pharmacy support, team logistics, as well as technical rescue and assessment resources), a team leader, three trucks, a base camp trailer, (which will support the team with food, shelter and power), a field hospital equipment trailer, and the rescue equipment and transport trailer.  The team will also be able to carry significant quantities of fuel and water to be self-contained. The field hospital has limited diagnostic capability (no advanced radiography and lab equipment at this time). It does include gas anesthesia, basic surgery packs, autoclave, surgery lights, tables, etc.  If the requesting state is able to provide veterinarians, the team can be reduced by two veterinarians. Deployment of the field hospital should be in conjunction with a shelter team.

The VETS team is in the process of developing mission response packages to provide cost estimates for an EMAC deployment. Please contact John Haven, 352-294-4254, if you have questions.