Menu UF Health Home Menu
 

Pathologist named associate dean for students and instruction

Published: February 17th, 2012

Category: News Releases

Dr. Pamela GinnDr. Pamela E. Ginn, a veterinary pathologist, has been named associate dean for students and instruction at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine following a national search.

Ginn has served as a member of the college’s faculty since 1992. She will begin her new duties immediately and will assume full responsibilities in March, following the retirement of Paul Gibbs, B.V.Sc., Ph.D. from the position.

“Dr. Ginn has received numerous awards for teaching excellence and has a long-standing interest in students,” said the college’s dean, Glen Hoffsis, D.V.M. “She is a great addition to the college administration and will provide strong leadership to the Office for Students and Instruction.”

Ginn has most recently served as a consulting pathologist for Specialty VETPATH in Seattle, Wash., and as an adjunct professor of pathology in the college’s department of infectious diseases and pathology. She was an associate professor in that department from 1998-2007.

Ginn received her D.V.M. degree from Colorado State University in 1983 and worked in small animal practice prior to entering UF’s pathology residency program, which she completed in 1992.

In 2011, Ginn was honored for her teaching by the American College of Veterinary Dermatologists, which presented her with its Excellence in Teaching Award. She was named Teacher of the Year by junior UF veterinary students in 2003 and again in 2006.

In 1998, she received the UF veterinary college’s prestigious Norden Distinguished Teacher of the Year Award.

Ginn’s goals include becoming informed about the learning styles of current generations of students and using this information to benefit the educational experience of veterinary students and the faculty that teach them. She also has a keen interest in addressing student debt load, streamlining the time frame of the educational process and expanding career options for veterinarians that would help make the One Health Initiative a reality for veterinarians.

As a mother of three children, Ginn also plans to work to help students gain skills to help them lead a professional life that enables them to set priorities for living a balanced life. She loves to teach and plans to continue to contribute to the education of the students and future veterinary pathologists. On a University and community level, she would like to participate in projects that promote inclusion of individuals with disabilities in the educational process.

“Technology and the ease of access of information in today’s digital world present new opportunities for improving methods of information delivery and assessing student learning,” Ginn said.